rue Lepic

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In early June of 1886, Theo and Vincent moved out of the apartment on Rue Laval and into one at 54 Rue Lepic. With Vincent’s arrival in Paris that February, the Rue Laval flat had become too small. The new apartment was spacious by Parisian standards; at any rate, Vincent had his own studio, a room at the back with …

rue Laval

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When Vincent arrived in Paris on 28 February 1886, a few months earlier than planned, he moved into his brother Theo’s small apartment at 25 Rue Laval (now Rue Victor Massé). In a letter sent before Vincent left Antwerp, Theo had told him the flat was too small to share and it would be best if he waited until after …

Auberge Ravoux

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Upon arrival in Auvers-sur-Oise on 20 May 1890, Vincent rented a room on the second floor of Auberge Ravoux in Place de la Mairie. Dr Gachet had advised him to use the village’s other inn, Saint-Aubin in Rue de Pontoise, but Vincent found it too expensive at six francs per night. Arthur Gustave Ravoux and his wife, Adeline Louise Touillet, …

Saint-Paul-de-Mausole

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Vincent came to Saint-Remy de Provence on 8 May 1889 to be voluntarily committed to the Saint-Paul de Mausole psychiatric institution, which was housed in a former monastery. He had suffered a series of severe breakdowns since December 1888 and believed he should be institutionalised for his own sake and that of others. He received treatment from his doctor, Théophile …

Café de la Gare

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On 7 May 1889, Vincent took a room at the Café de la Gare on Place Lamartine at a rate of one franc per night. He had recently begun using the Yellow House as a studio. Even though Vincent became friendly with the café’s owners, Joseph and Marie Ginoux, it did not stop him from arguing with them over his …

Restaurant Carrel

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During his first two months in Arles, Vincent stayed in a room at the Carrel hotel-restaurant, owned by Albert Carrel and his wife, Cathérine Carrel-Garcin. The hotel was a two-storey building with a small roof terrace and a first-floor balcony. Shortly after arriving in Arles, Vincent wrote to his brother Theo: “At times it seems to me that my blood …

The yellow house

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On 1 May 1889, Vincent rented part of a yellow stucco faced building on the Place Lam­­­­artine in Arles at a rate of 15 francs per month. Initially using it as a studio, he began living there too on 1 September. Vincent nicknamed the building the Yellow House and planned to abundantly decorate its interior with his own paintings. Vincent …

Kennington Road, ca. 1860

Kosthuis Parker

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Vincent van Gogh’s sister Anna also came to London in July 1874; they lived together at the Loyers’ boarding house. Vincent was delighted by Anna’s move: “I’d like so much to get to know her better than I do, for in the last few years we’ve actually seen very little of each other, and we only half know each other.” …

Boarding house Loyer

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A few months after arriving in London, Vincent van Gogh moved into a boarding house run by the widow Sarah-Ursula Loyer in the Brixton neighbourhood, where she also ran a boys’ school. He had previously lived in another house, of which the address remains unknown Although he initially liked it there, after a few months he began looking for more …

Home

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When Vincent worked at Stokes’s school, he lived with the other assistant teacher and four pupils in a house on the same square as the school. There was a patch of grass in the centre where the pupils played in the afternoons. On moving in, Vincent wrote to Theo that his room needed prints on its walls. He probably covered …

Family Decrucq

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On his arrival in Cuesmes, Vincent found accommodation with Edouard Joseph Francq at Rue du Pavillon 5. He later rented a room from the neighbouring Decrucq family; it is not known exactlywhen he moved in. But, by then, he had decided – albeit irresolutely and on his brother Theo’s advice – to focus on his art. Thus, at the Decrucqs …

Edouard Francq

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After the Belgian evangelism committee refused to extend his contract as a lay preacher, Vincent moved to the village of Cuesmes, where he found lodging with the preacher Edouard Joseph Francq (1819–1902). It must have been a difficult time for Vincent. He had failed at his work once again, embarrassing and confusing his family and himself. Relations must have become …

Family Denis

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After he arrived in the Borinage, the businessman Benjamin Vanderhaegen helped Vincent to find accommodation with the farmer Jean Baptiste Denis and his wife, Estere Fiévez, in Petit-Wasmes. By then, Vincent was working as a lay preacher for the Belgian evangelism committee. The rent was a low 30 francs per month because Vincent taught the couple’s children in the evenings. …

Vanderhaegen

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When Vincent arrived from Brussels in the village of Patûrage, he received a warm welcome from the businessman Benjamin Vanderhaegen and lived at his house for a few weeks. Vanderhaegen found Vincent accommodation with the farmer Jean Baptiste Denis in the nearby village of Wasmes. There, Vincent took poor care of himself and shunned earthly things to such an extreme …

Lodgment

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When Vincent returned to Brussels in the autumn of 1880 to further his artistic development, he found a little room in a small guest house on Boulevard du Midi. The rent was 50 Belgian francs per month – not cheap, but reasonable in light of the high prices in Brussels. However, the room was unsuitable for Vincent to work in: …

Family Plugge

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When Vincent arrived in Brussels to study at the Flemish school for evangelists, he found lodging at the home of Pieter Jacobus Plugge in the suburb of Laken. Plugge was a council member at the church on Sint-Katelijneplein, which housed the training school. In his lodgings, Vincent denied himself every luxury, even sleeping on a rug on the floor rather …

Studio house

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Vincent arrived in Antwerp in late November of 1885. He rented a room from the married Dutch couple Willem Henricus Brandel and Anna Wilhelmina Huberta. Before his departure, Vincent did not expect to be able to afford a studio in Antwerp. But he managed to rent a small space adjacent to his room at the Brandels’ that he was able …

Uncle Jan

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Vincent van Gogh lived with his uncle Johannes “Jan” van Gogh, the head of Amsterdam’s naval dockyard in the eastern part of the city. Vincent often got up early in the morning, and he enjoyed watching the thousands of workers trickle into the dockyard; the sound reminded him of the murmur of the sea. The lively surroundings fascinated Vincent, and …

Boarding House No.1

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When Vincent left The Hague for Etten in September 1883, he left his drawings and sketches behind. From 21 to 25 December 1883, he returned to pack and ship his possessions. During his brief stay, he lodged at the boarding house Kosthuis No. 1 and visited his former girlfriend Sien. Assendelftstraat 16 was the property of the Haagse Maatschappij van …

Pension Roos

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Vincent arrived in The Hague in 1869 to work as the youngest clerk of the art dealers Goupil & Cie. He moved into a boarding house run by Marinus Roos and his wife, Dina Margrieta van Aalst, at Lange Beestenmarkt 32. Despite initially earning just 30 guilders in his job at Goupil & Cie, Vincent paid 34 guilders for room …

Schenkweg 136

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After arriving in The Hague in late 1881 after an argument with his father, Vincent found a studio at Schenkweg 138 within a week. The building was soon too small for him, however, because he had become involved with the pregnant prostitute Clasina Maria “Sien” Hoornik (1850–1904) and the couple decided to live together. The apartment was also run-down. Vincent …

Schenkweg 138

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Vincent lived at Schenkweg 138 from 1 January 1882 to 4 July 1882. He also had a studio there. It was only a few streets away from the studio of artist Anton Mauve (1838–1888), a key figure in Vincent’s life at the time. On 3 January 1882, just a week after arriving in The Hague after a fierce row with …

Schafrat

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Vincent’s studio at his parents’ house was small and badly situated and relations with his family were not optimal. He therefore longed for a new studio. In May 1884, he rented one from the Catholic sexton Johannes Schafrat and his wife, Adriana Schafrat-Van Eerd, for 75 guilders per year: “Two rooms — one large and one small — en suite. …

Parsonage

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When Vincent came to Nuenen on 5 December 1883, he moved in with his parents at the parsonage of the Dutch Reformed Church. He was met with a chilly reception and the tension between Vincent and his parson father was high. Still, in mid-December, his parents gave him their mangle room to use as a studio. The room was damp …